THE NEXTDDS Blog

Dental Apps for Each Year of Dental School

Posted by THE NEXTDDS on Tue, Apr 24, 2018 @ 10:15 AM

bigstock--190028161The field of dentistry is experiencing myriad changes, constantly evolving to best suit the needs of patients and dentists. As Steve Parker, editor-in-chief of The Profitable Dentist magazine, stated in a THE NEXTDDS interview, “Dentistry is in the best place it’s ever been.” The emergence of advanced technology aids dental students in their studies as never before. They may access information with greater ease than classes that graduated earlier. It was only a matter of time before mobile applications found their way into dentistry and they are here now. These 4 mobile apps in particular cater to specific years of dental school today.

 

BoneBox Dental Pro – 1st Year

BoneBox™ Dental Pro is a patient communication tool and real-time 3D medical education app featuring detailed anatomical models of human dental anatomy. Developed by a team of animators, anatomists, certified medical illustrators, and programmers using actual human CT imaging data, BoneBox™ Dental Pro portrays the most accurate 3D modeling technology available. You may view every tooth in the mouth three-dimensionally and rotate each tooth to see it from every viewpoint. While studying your dental anatomy class notes, this is a great way to interact with details of each tooth.

 

NBDE Prep Apps – 2nd Year

One of the most important applications for dental students are NBDE Preparation Apps. The American Red Cross’ First Aid and Dental Boards Mastery are perfect on-the-go study apps for dental students. The NBDE Part II Exam Prep app is designed to help better prepare for your National Board Dental Examination exam, providing more than 3,000 multiple-choice questions. Dental students are no longer required to lug around heavy textbooks while going from class to class.

 

Dental Drugs – 3rd Year

Dental Drugs & Anesthesia is a must-have application for rising dental professionals, as well as for established practicing dentists. It provides several helpful clinical tips as well as a quick refresher on the dosages of analgesics, antifungals, antibiotics, and more as you start to use them in clinic. The student can may also calculate the maximum dosage for each type of local anesthetic based on weight. The application features a very simple design for quick reference and anesthetics calculation. It also provides access to the 100 most commonly prescribed drugs with their relevant dose, dispensary, instructions, and precautions, email medication info,  instructions for patients, local dental anesthetics calculator, and much more.

Dental Economics – 4th Year

During the last year of dental school, the student will want to learn more of the business side of dentistry. Fourth-year students will be collecting business cards and attending networking events to meet dental professionals. The Dental Economics publication helps dentists improve their practices through sound business advice and the latest information on new dental products, including the latest advances in dental technology. The Dental Economics app offers current and past issues of the publication, articles designed for mobile readability, photo slideshows, and informative videos.

 

Smart phones are at the fingertips of most students today, so it was logical that certain companies would incorporate a way for dental students to learn virtually. As dentistry continues to evolve with new technology, creating a way to learn through mobile application is one aspect dental students truly appreciate.

Tags: technology, mobile, app, dental school, NBDE, dental drugs, dental economics

Professor's Perspective: Lisa Harper Mallonee on Student Technology

Posted by Christina Ferraro on Fri, Mar 06, 2015 @ 06:39 PM

Advisory Board Mallonee
Lisa F. Mallonee, BSDH, MPH, RD, LD
Texas A & M Baylor College of Dentistry
Associate Professor, Caruth School of Dental Hygiene

Harper Mallonee

What is the most rewarding aspect of your dental specialty?

I get to combine my two areas of interest (dental hygiene and nutrition) to educate students and practitioners.

 

What digital or online tools do you use in the classroom or clinical setting?

I use Blackboard in the classroom.

 

How often do you assign students material that requires online research?

My students are given several projects that require online research.

 

What advice can you give current dental students nearing graduation who are interested in your specialty?

As the Surgeon General stated in May of 2000 in his landmark report “The mouth is the window to all diseases of the body”. It is crucial that dental practitioners gain knowledge and expertise in treating the whole patient and not just the mouth.

 

Does this generation of students present any unique challenges to educators? 

The current generation of students are very hands-on and technologically savvy. It is important to keep them stimulated and address these learning styles in both the clinic and classroom settings.

 

What do you find to be the most difficult dental concept to teach?

The application of nutrition in the dental setting is often times a difficult concept to teach. The etiology of caries involves this application because host factors, bacteria, saliva and diet are the four crucial components. Oftentimes students make this application more difficult than it has to be. Diet (forms of foods, frequency of consumption and timing of foods/beverages) should be addressed and discussed with each of our patients who are at risk or present evidence of dental decay.


What digital adjunct materials do you find most useful for students, and for what lessons do you use them?

In our dental hygiene clinic, the only digital adjunct materials we use are digital x-rays. I think a digital camera is an incredible teaching tool for both patient and student. It allows the student to educate on their findings in the mouth while the patient gets a visual image of what is being discussed.


Why did you choose your specialty?

I have a passion for prevention! As both a registered dietitian and a registered dental hygienist, my goal is to educate and encourage the practical application of diet and nutrition in the dental setting. I also strive to foster interprofessional collaboration between dietetics practitioners and oral health care professionals. My enthusiasm for educating patients, students and practitioners about the oral health-nutrition link is what drives me professionally to make strides in this area.


What do you wish you had known about the dental industry as a whole when you were a student?

I wish I had known more about public health professional opportunities for the dental professional.

Tags: education, technology, dental, advice, elearning, educator

Professor's Perspective: E.R. Schwedhelm

Posted by Christina Ferraro on Fri, Feb 13, 2015 @ 04:50 PM

Advisory Board Schwedhelm

Schwedhelm

 

E.R. Schwedhelm

Clinical Assistant Professor, Restorative Dentistry

University of Washington School of Dentistry

 

What is the most rewarding aspect of your dental specialty?

The interdisciplinary treatment planning

 

What digital or online tools do you use in the classroom or clinical setting?

I started using Canvas and PowerPoint Mix, have also used TurningPoint

 

What advice can you give current dental students nearing graduation who are interested in your specialty?

Get involved in study clubs

 

What do you find to be the most difficult dental concept to teach? Why?

CAD/CAM technology. The faculty are not trained, there are constant upgrades to software, equipment, cost, facilities, staff. Students have the impression that just a mouse click will do all.

 

Why did you choose your specialty?

Interdisciplinary treatment

Tags: classroom, education, technology, dental, elearning, educator

Professor's Perspective: Dr. David Dunning on Digital Engagement

Posted by Christina Ferraro on Fri, Feb 06, 2015 @ 05:04 PM

Advisory Board Dunning
UNMC Logo      
David G. Dunning, M.A., Ph.D.
Professor, Dept. of Oral Biology

What digital or online tools do you use in the classroom or clinical setting?

Dental management simulation (www.dentalsimulations.com)

 

How often do you assign students material that requires online research?

During the management simulation, weekly in that semester. Students also complete on-line courses in motivational interviewing and practice management at dentalcare.com.

 

Does this generation of students present any unique challenges to educators?

In an electronic age, attention spans can be challenging to engage and maintain.

 

What do you find to be the most difficult dental concept to teach? 

Dental insurance and practice valuations are both very complicated and involve many concepts, students are often unfamiliar with these concepts.

 

What digital adjunct materials do you find most useful for students, and for what lessons do you use them?

--Supplemental videos for the management simulation.

--Posted supplemental materials on THNEXTDDS and Blackboard.

--On-line course modules.

These options allow students to grasp concepts and learn at least to some degree at their own pace.

Tags: classroom, education, digital, dental education, technology, dental, elearning, educator

Professor's Perspective: Dr. Matthew Brock

Posted by Christina Ferraro on Fri, Jan 16, 2015 @ 02:54 PM

Advisory Board Brock
Brock
Dr. Matthew Brock
Visiting Professor, Department of Endodontics
University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry

1. What is the most rewarding aspect of your dental specialty?

A lot of our patients present to us with a tooth that is hurting.  It is rewarding to know that we can diagnose which tooth is the source of the problem, treat it with a root canal and get them almost immediate relief.

2. What digital or online tools do you use in the classroom or clinical setting?

We use Schick 33 digital radiographs and use this to better educate our patients about a root canal, before and after the procedure.

    3. What advice can you give current dental students nearing graduation who are interested in your specialty?

    I would recommend to shadow other endodontist, have an idea of where you want to live and practice and don’t get into it thinking you are going to make “mega bucks”…

    4. Does this generation of students present any unique challenges to educators?

    I feel that they are a little more ready for instant gratification and sometimes have unrealistic expectations of what it takes to build a solid practice.  I feel that it is easy to have mentor and assume that you to will be there in a year or two, whereas the reality is that it can take 5-10 years to build a practice.

      5. What digital adjunct materials do you find most useful for students, and for what lessons do you use them?

      I typically use video filmed through my microscope & radiographs in my Powerpoint or Key note presentations.

      6. Why did you choose your specialty?

      My step-father, John McSpadden, limited his practice to endodontics in the 1970s and developed the McSpadden Compactor, and later NiTi rotary files in the early 1990s.  I watched his NiTi rotary file company grow & even worked with the company 2 summers during college and found what he was doing fascinating and decided that I wanted to follow in his footsteps.

      7. What do you wish you had known about the dental industry as a whole when you were a student?

      A lot of research is manipulated by the principal investigators to prove or illustrate the point that their sponsor is trying to promote.  This leads us to a lot of articles that are basically paid advertisements that people sometimes read as the latest and greatest.

      Tags: classroom, education, THE NEXTDDS, technology, student, dental, advice, specialty, endodontics, elearning, educator

      Professor's Perspective: Dr. Anthony Eltink's Advice for Dental Grads

      Posted by Christina Ferraro on Fri, Dec 19, 2014 @ 05:39 PM

      This is the second in a series of interviews highlighting THE NEXTDDS Academic Advisory Board members and their views on dental education today. From their choices in digital tools in the classroom to what advice they would give current dental students, these academicians will weigh in on their experiences.

       

      Advisory Board Eltink

      Anthony P. Eltink, DMD, MS

      Orthodontics

       

      What is the most rewarding aspect of your dental specialty?

      Being an orthodontist allows you to form relationships with children and families, and it is a pleasure to watch them grow up.  The positive impacts on a child's self confidence and self esteem that are directly related to the improvements in their smiles are incredible, and it is great to be a part of these changes.

       

      What digital or online tools do you use in the classroom or clinical setting?

      The biggest advancements in digital technology in orthodontics lie in the realm of digital treatment planning and execution with appliances such as Invisalign.  Taking the patient's teeth to a computer screen, manipulating their occlusion in a virtual world, and then applying that clinically is an amazing advancement in orthodontic technology.

       

      How often do you assign students material that requires online research?

      Much of the learning for our orthodontic residents comes from finding an understanding of the literature and determining orthodontic treatments that are evidence-based and sound.  The internet is rich with both information and misinformation, and we work hard to create orthodontists who understand the power of online tools.

       

      What advice can you give current dental students nearing graduation who are interested in your specialty?

      Interview well, and be different.  Orthodontics as a specialty is very competitive, and you will be competing with other very qualified applicants.  If you interview well and are memorable it will go a long way toward ranking highly for the residency match.

       

      Does this generation of students present any unique challenges to educators? If so, explain.

      Education in a residency program is driven by self-motivation.  We provide opportunities to learn, but there is no spoon-feeding of information.  Younger generations might not be used to this method of instruction, and might miss opportunities to learn.

       

      What do you find to be the most difficult dental concept to teach? Why?

      Craniofacial growth and development - the head and neck go through so many changes during periods of growth, and the complex nature of dental development takes place in this very dynamic environment.  These are difficult concepts to teach and to test.

       

      What digital adjunct materials do you find most useful for students, and for what lessons do you use them?

      Technologies for virtual treatment outcomes and digital treatment planning are crucial to understanding orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.  We use these routinely in our orthodontic department.

       

      Why did you choose your specialty?

      I chose orthodontics because of the total package that it offers - low stress, "clean" dentistry, you get to work with kids, no emergencies, generous compensation, physically less demanding than general dentistry.... 

       

      What do you wish you had known about the dental industry as a whole when you were a student?

      I wish I had known more about running a business.  We spend so many hours learning about diseases, teeth and therapies, and are then thrust out in the world and asked to run a business.   Well-organized, specialty specific business courses should be added to the dental school and residency curricula.

       

       

       

      Tags: classroom, education, technology, student, dental, advice, online, change, industry, grad

      Dental School? Yeah, There's an App for That!

      Posted by John Papa on Tue, Aug 13, 2013 @ 10:06 AM

      For as valuable as texting, tweeting and social networking are culturally, these functions represent only a fraction of mobile technology functionality. iPhones, iPads, Android phones, and other smart devices offer unprecedented value as educational and professional development tools that enhance traditional classroom instruction, complement clinical training, and expand research beyond the library walls. Online and remote activities in programs such as The NEXT DDS, platforms like Blackboard, and downloadable apps are all aspects of digital age remote learning.

      There are currently more than 700 apps available for general medical education, such as Medscape, which offers physician and pharmacy directories specialty-specific medical news, or Taber’s Medical Dictionary, which contains 60,000 definitions, 1,000 images, and more than 30,000 audio pronunciations.

      There are also apps designed specifically for dental students, from first year basics to final year hands-on clinic work.

      While the iPhone may be the best known smartphone, there is an array of smartphones on the market that offer advanced functionality that can make it easy to use educational apps, online resources, and other remote learning tools. Android phones are becoming increasingly popular. The HTC EVO, billed as the first 4G phone inAmerica, offers the fastest speeds available for downloading material and overall functionality. The EVO and the Motorola Droid X turn into roaming hotspots for other devices, such as a student’s laptop. The Droid X also offers up to 40GB of storage.

      The new Windows Phone 7 smartphones, which include the HTC HD 7, Samsung Focus, and the LG Quantum are individualized communication devices that accommodate a student’s particular educational needs.

      User-friendly slate devices such as the iPad, HP Slate, and ExoPC Windows 7 are becoming increasing popular among students. These devices are perfect for reading, browsing the web and organizing materials.

      With smart phones becoming ubiquitous, college programs are incorporating more remote education tools into their curricula. For dental students, resources such as THE NEXT DDS offer access to articles, procedures, reports, study aids, and information on traditional, new and/or experimental clinical procedures. And, of course, smart devices also allow students to communicate with each other and with their instructors.

      While academic class and clinical instruction will always be an aspect of dental school, utilizing digital technology to expand student learning opportunities will produced the most knowledgeable and highest-quality dentists possible.

      *Adapted with permission from Kathleen Tracy, Writer. Los Angeles, CA

      Tags: ipad, smartphone, technology, iphone, electronic, app, ipod

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