THE NEXTDDS Blog

Why Photography is Important in Dentistry

Posted by THE NEXTDDS on Fri, Dec 16, 2016 @ 01:01 PM


Looking ahead to your career in dentistry, one begins to think of the major aspects that surround a practitioner’s life. Between working one-on-one with patients, running your small business, marketing your future practice (making sure to be aware of new trends and technologies in the marketplace), and increasing your skills, it can seem like nothing can go at the wayside. But have you thought lately about photography, and specifically how much of an important factor it plays in dentistry?

Photography’s use in dentistry cannot be understated. When it comes to practice marketing, no better tool is at the dentist’s disposal. With so much weight put on new business and production, constantly working towards getting new patients in while retaining existing patients, photography can be a good way to communicate directly towards healthcare consumers and support a healthy online presence.

griffin-presentation.jpgA recent presentation from Dr. Jack Griffin, well-respected clinician, author, and educator entitled, “Excellence in Digital Photography & Case Acceptance,” explains how quality photographs support your future practice and help you communicate effectively with your patients. Here’s how to use dental photography to help market your future dental practice:

Photos Over Words

You don’t want to drive a text-heavy marketing message, as consumers and visitors will not be too keen on sticking around to read all your information. In this fast-paced world of social media, it’s challenging to keep users and visitors on your content for long. Lead with photos and let them do the talking. If they’re of good quality and the text adds in pertinent details about the type of care provided, you’ll be queued up to engage visitors.

Smartphone Friendly

Keeping with the times and being optimized for mobile browsers is key. With smartphones and so many easily distracting elements to online usage and screen time, it’s important to hook the consumers in right away with photos to keep them on your practice website or social accounts. With Instagram and other photo-centric apps and technologies at the forefront of current trends, it’s easy to see why taking and developing good quality photos will help you win over your fans and followers. Not only does it allow you to establish your bona fides as a clinician, but photos also allow you to demonstrate the personality of the practice and its staff when posted for convenient viewing.

Themes

griffin-office-photo-presentation.jpgIf you have a knack for design, then there are plenty of opportunities to have some fun with your practice marketing and content! Build a logo or structure your future practice on color schemes or designs. For holidays or other important events, give your colors and design a nice upgrade to welcome the coming traditions. Consistency in keeping to a theme or major design tactic will allow better flow when it comes to your marketing principals. If this is not a skill set you have, there are experienced dental website designers and consultants to guide your vision to the desktops and mobile devices of your prospective patients. Request a referral to a provider and start from there.

It’s easy to forget about how much marketing plays a huge role in the success of your future practice. However, it’s one of the most important ways you are going to get new patients to schedule appointments and build your practice. Compared to your clinical training, it’s not that hard to do! Be aware of how visual marketing has become and you will have great ideas of how to best evoke the philosophies and culture of your future practice. Have fun with it!

Tags: dentistry, marketing, photography, digital photography

The "New Dentist Track" at the CDS Midwinter Meeting

Posted by John Papa on Mon, Mar 02, 2015 @ 09:39 AM

This year, the Chicago Dental Society offered a track of four courses specifically written and designed for new dentists. These courses were intended to give new dentists insight and tips in certain areas that might be overlooked or not covered in-depth in traditional dental school curricula. The four courses that were included in the “New Dentist Track” were:
  • Leadership in Social Media for New Dentists: Presented by Ms. Rita Zamora
  • Risky Business: What are the Dangers and How to Prepare: Presented by Dr. Roy Shelburne
  • Career Paths in the Private Practice of Dentistry: Presented by Mr. Peter Ackerman, and
  • Sales free Selling: The Death of Sales and the Rise of New Methodology: Presented by Dr. Steve Fretzin

In her social media course, Ms. Rita Zamora began by establishing the idea of creating and maintaining your online brand/identity. Her words of advice to the would-be social media savvy dentist were: know yourself, know your brand, live your brand, be visible, and lead by example. She went on to discuss social media marketing through Facebook ads or Google ad words, and suggested using small incentives to get patients to “Check-in”, “Like”, or “Follow” your social media outlets; such as giving out whitening strips (or some other one-time-use item) for check-ins before appointments. As for negative patient reviews on social media, her advice was to either ignore them or to reach out to the complaining patient personally via email or phone, talk to them, and see if they will take the review down afterwards. You can read more about Social Media Marketing and Integrating Social Media in your Future Practice on THE NEXTDDS.

Dr. Roy Shelburne’s presentation on risk management was focused on pointing out the small things that sometimes get overlooked by new dentists which could result in a visit from the IRS. He began his presentation by saying that every new dentist should know the legal definition of intent. He then went on to describe what, in his eyes, constitute the five biggest legal threats to your practice: failure to comply with HIPPA, OSHA, tax laws, the dental practice acts of your state, and other contractual obligations. He touched briefly on informed consent, malpractice claims, and record keeping; stating that keeping air-tight records of every procedure, why it was done, and how it was done is a good way to insulate yourself from malpractice suits, but that the biggest protection from malpractice suits is to have a good relationship with your patients.

Mr. Ackerman led off his “Career Paths” course by explaining his outlook about the future of the dental profession. Due to a number of factors including increased competitiveness in the field, growing student debt, distribution of new dental offices, changes in patient values, and older dentists being forced to work longer, the allure of “corporate dentistry” appears to be growing for new graduates. He does, however, still believe there are viable paths to private practice ownership for young dentists. He went on to discuss associateships at length, including why they sometimes fail, how to best insulate yourself from liability and failure, many legal issues that arise through associateships including contractual obligations, terms of agreement, compensation, "due diligence" research, and types of practice sales (retirement [full]) sales, delayed full sales, extended sales, and partial sales). Read more about making the transition from Student to Professional in THE NEXTDDS Magazine

Steve Fretzin ispecializes in coaching business owners on the finer points of sales and investment. In his presentation, Mr. Fretzin explained his new methodology of sales, which favors a much more consultative and relationship-oriented approach over the traditional sales model. He then explained how his sales model is specifically applicable in the dental/medical fields, especially during patient consultation and in attempting to garner interest and consent for treatment plans.

The New Dentist track at the CDS Midwinter meeting is a way for young dentists and current dental students alike to learn some of the finer points of business management, legal matters, and marketing that may not have been covered in depth during dental school. Each of the speakers were passionate their subjects, and gave easily applicable tips that could improve business, exposure, and revenue while reducing risk and liability for a new practice owner. As dental students attending the CDS Midwinter, the New Dentist track is one way to get a jump on one’s professional career, and to start thinking about the real-world business of dentistry in a new and exciting way.

Tags: midwinter, CDS, CE, continuing education, marketing, liability, sales, New Dentist Track, social media, legal, associateship

Latest Posts

Posts by category