THE NEXTDDS Blog

Professor's Perspective: Lisa Harper Mallonee on Student Technology

Posted by Christina Ferraro on Fri, Mar 06, 2015 @ 06:39 PM

Advisory Board Mallonee
Lisa F. Mallonee, BSDH, MPH, RD, LD
Texas A & M Baylor College of Dentistry
Associate Professor, Caruth School of Dental Hygiene

Harper Mallonee

What is the most rewarding aspect of your dental specialty?

I get to combine my two areas of interest (dental hygiene and nutrition) to educate students and practitioners.

 

What digital or online tools do you use in the classroom or clinical setting?

I use Blackboard in the classroom.

 

How often do you assign students material that requires online research?

My students are given several projects that require online research.

 

What advice can you give current dental students nearing graduation who are interested in your specialty?

As the Surgeon General stated in May of 2000 in his landmark report “The mouth is the window to all diseases of the body”. It is crucial that dental practitioners gain knowledge and expertise in treating the whole patient and not just the mouth.

 

Does this generation of students present any unique challenges to educators? 

The current generation of students are very hands-on and technologically savvy. It is important to keep them stimulated and address these learning styles in both the clinic and classroom settings.

 

What do you find to be the most difficult dental concept to teach?

The application of nutrition in the dental setting is often times a difficult concept to teach. The etiology of caries involves this application because host factors, bacteria, saliva and diet are the four crucial components. Oftentimes students make this application more difficult than it has to be. Diet (forms of foods, frequency of consumption and timing of foods/beverages) should be addressed and discussed with each of our patients who are at risk or present evidence of dental decay.


What digital adjunct materials do you find most useful for students, and for what lessons do you use them?

In our dental hygiene clinic, the only digital adjunct materials we use are digital x-rays. I think a digital camera is an incredible teaching tool for both patient and student. It allows the student to educate on their findings in the mouth while the patient gets a visual image of what is being discussed.


Why did you choose your specialty?

I have a passion for prevention! As both a registered dietitian and a registered dental hygienist, my goal is to educate and encourage the practical application of diet and nutrition in the dental setting. I also strive to foster interprofessional collaboration between dietetics practitioners and oral health care professionals. My enthusiasm for educating patients, students and practitioners about the oral health-nutrition link is what drives me professionally to make strides in this area.


What do you wish you had known about the dental industry as a whole when you were a student?

I wish I had known more about public health professional opportunities for the dental professional.

Tags: education, technology, dental, advice, elearning, educator

Professor's Perspective: E.R. Schwedhelm

Posted by Christina Ferraro on Fri, Feb 13, 2015 @ 04:50 PM

Advisory Board Schwedhelm

Schwedhelm

 

E.R. Schwedhelm

Clinical Assistant Professor, Restorative Dentistry

University of Washington School of Dentistry

 

What is the most rewarding aspect of your dental specialty?

The interdisciplinary treatment planning

 

What digital or online tools do you use in the classroom or clinical setting?

I started using Canvas and PowerPoint Mix, have also used TurningPoint

 

What advice can you give current dental students nearing graduation who are interested in your specialty?

Get involved in study clubs

 

What do you find to be the most difficult dental concept to teach? Why?

CAD/CAM technology. The faculty are not trained, there are constant upgrades to software, equipment, cost, facilities, staff. Students have the impression that just a mouse click will do all.

 

Why did you choose your specialty?

Interdisciplinary treatment

Tags: classroom, education, technology, dental, elearning, educator

Professor's Perspective: Dr. David Dunning on Digital Engagement

Posted by Christina Ferraro on Fri, Feb 06, 2015 @ 05:04 PM

Advisory Board Dunning
UNMC Logo      
David G. Dunning, M.A., Ph.D.
Professor, Dept. of Oral Biology

What digital or online tools do you use in the classroom or clinical setting?

Dental management simulation (www.dentalsimulations.com)

 

How often do you assign students material that requires online research?

During the management simulation, weekly in that semester. Students also complete on-line courses in motivational interviewing and practice management at dentalcare.com.

 

Does this generation of students present any unique challenges to educators?

In an electronic age, attention spans can be challenging to engage and maintain.

 

What do you find to be the most difficult dental concept to teach? 

Dental insurance and practice valuations are both very complicated and involve many concepts, students are often unfamiliar with these concepts.

 

What digital adjunct materials do you find most useful for students, and for what lessons do you use them?

--Supplemental videos for the management simulation.

--Posted supplemental materials on THNEXTDDS and Blackboard.

--On-line course modules.

These options allow students to grasp concepts and learn at least to some degree at their own pace.

Tags: classroom, education, digital, dental education, technology, dental, elearning, educator

Professor's Perspective: Dr. Matthew Brock

Posted by Christina Ferraro on Fri, Jan 16, 2015 @ 02:54 PM

Advisory Board Brock
Brock
Dr. Matthew Brock
Visiting Professor, Department of Endodontics
University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry

1. What is the most rewarding aspect of your dental specialty?

A lot of our patients present to us with a tooth that is hurting.  It is rewarding to know that we can diagnose which tooth is the source of the problem, treat it with a root canal and get them almost immediate relief.

2. What digital or online tools do you use in the classroom or clinical setting?

We use Schick 33 digital radiographs and use this to better educate our patients about a root canal, before and after the procedure.

    3. What advice can you give current dental students nearing graduation who are interested in your specialty?

    I would recommend to shadow other endodontist, have an idea of where you want to live and practice and don’t get into it thinking you are going to make “mega bucks”…

    4. Does this generation of students present any unique challenges to educators?

    I feel that they are a little more ready for instant gratification and sometimes have unrealistic expectations of what it takes to build a solid practice.  I feel that it is easy to have mentor and assume that you to will be there in a year or two, whereas the reality is that it can take 5-10 years to build a practice.

      5. What digital adjunct materials do you find most useful for students, and for what lessons do you use them?

      I typically use video filmed through my microscope & radiographs in my Powerpoint or Key note presentations.

      6. Why did you choose your specialty?

      My step-father, John McSpadden, limited his practice to endodontics in the 1970s and developed the McSpadden Compactor, and later NiTi rotary files in the early 1990s.  I watched his NiTi rotary file company grow & even worked with the company 2 summers during college and found what he was doing fascinating and decided that I wanted to follow in his footsteps.

      7. What do you wish you had known about the dental industry as a whole when you were a student?

      A lot of research is manipulated by the principal investigators to prove or illustrate the point that their sponsor is trying to promote.  This leads us to a lot of articles that are basically paid advertisements that people sometimes read as the latest and greatest.

      Tags: classroom, education, THE NEXTDDS, technology, student, dental, advice, specialty, endodontics, elearning, educator

      Professor's Perspective: Dental Educator & Clinician John Christensen

      Posted by Christina Ferraro on Fri, Dec 12, 2014 @ 05:26 PM

      This is the first in a series of interviews highlighting THE NEXTDDS Academic Advisory Board members and their views on dental education today. From their choices in digital tools in the classroom to what advice they would give current dental students, these academicians will weigh in on their experiences.

       

      Advisory Board Christensen

      describe the image

      John Christensen, DDS, MS, MS

      Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics

       

      What is the most rewarding aspect of your dental specialty?

      Working with a varied population daily (children and adolescents) who make every appointment different.  You never know what is coming next.

       

      What digital or online tools do you use in the classroom or clinical setting?

      Digital photos, x-rays, models for orthodontic diagnosis. I use Dolphin software to help work up orthodontic cases.  I use Pubmed, Google scholar alerts for information and education. Dentaltraumaguide.org is the best resource for trauma available.

       

      How often do you assign students material that requires online research?

      Often, it is a way of getting journal articles without the journal.

       

      What advice can you give current dental students nearing graduation who are interested in your specialty?

      Visit dentists in the specialty you are considering and observe for more than an afternoon.  Do they seem happy? Challenged? Frustrated?  That tells you a lot about the specialty.

       

      Does this generation of students present any unique challenges to educators? 

      Yes, the amount of information available to students is almost overwhelming.  Couple that with all the information coming from news, social media, etc. and I think the current generation has a difficult time finding time to focus on the material at hand. Multitasking is not the answer.

       

      What do you find to be the most difficult dental concept to teach?

      Critical thinking to apply different concepts to a single problem.  Students often know A, know B, and know C.  What they have trouble with is combining A, B, and C to make D which is the best solution to the problem.

       

      What digital adjunct materials do you find most useful for students, and for what lessons do you use them?

      Dentaltraumaguide.org for resource.  Dolphin Imaging to see what treatment might look like. 

       

      Why did you choose your specialty?

      Children create another dimension to treatment and that is time.  They change and one needs to understand growth and development to incorporate the changes into the treatment solutions.

       

      What do you wish you had known about the dental industry as a whole when you were a student?

      My father was a dentist so I knew most of what was happening.  I wish I knew more about where we are going.  Will dentistry and dentists just become technicians providing services or will we continue to be part of the health team?

      Tags: children, orthodontic, classroom, student, dental, elearning, educator, online

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