THE NEXTDDS Blog

The Top 7 Podcasts of THE NEXTDDS.com

Posted by THE NEXTDDS on Mon, Jun 04, 2018 @ 03:33 PM

Over the years, THE NEXTDDS has done numerous podcast interviews with students, established dentists, and other dental professionals. Many interviewees have shared thoughts regarding the dental school journey and their mentors. Here are 7 favorite interviews according to readers of THE NEXTDDS.

 Top7Podcasts

 

Dr Mykel Anderson (February 2016)

Dr Mykel Anderson ’17, a graduate of Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health, is currently enrolled in an Orthodontics Residency program at Roseman University of Health Sciences. In 2016, as a 3rd-year student, she spoke with THE NEXTDDS about the importance of digital education in dental school, experiences that influenced her to pursue dentistry, and her rewarding outreach trip to South Africa.

 

Gary Kadi (August 2017)

Gary Kadi is the CEO and founder of The Next Level Practice. In 2017, Mr. Kadi sat down with THE NEXTDDS and discussed his 3-fold perspective of the common challenges most dental students experience, his Treatment-Decision Matrix, and the importance of business and teamwork. His interview was broken into 2 parts. Listen to the second here.

 

Dr Emma Guzman (April 2016)

Dr Emma Guzman ’17, a graduate of the University at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine,  is now a Dental Resident at the Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center. In her 2016 interview, Guzman discussed her first patient experience, her meaningful mission trip to the Dominican Republic, and her unique story of how she first became interested in dentistry.  Listen to the second half of her interview here.

 

Dr Mai-Ly Duong (April 2017)

Dr Mai-Ly Duong is a general dentist and Assistant Professor at the Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health. Recently, she was listed on the American Dental Association’s 10 Under 10 List for her excellent work in the field. In an interview with THE NEXTDDS, she shared why she strives to make a change in the dental profession.

 

Dr Nick Letteri (March 2016)

Dr Nick Letteri ’17 is a graduate of LECOM School of Dental Medicine and currently works out of a DSO-supported practice in Tampa Bay, Florida. As a 3rd-year student, he sat down with THE NEXTDDS to express why social media is incredibly important for dental students and professionals alike. He also discussed how attending a mission trip in 8th grade led him to pursue dentistry.

 

Dr Jeri McCombs (May 2016)

Dr Jeri McCombs ’16 is a graduate of the Chicago College of Dentistry at the University of Illinois. She is currently a practicing dentist at Beaver Dam Dental in Chicago. On the cusp of her graduation, she spoke with THE NEXTDDS about her award-winning presentation of her case study at the American Prosthodontists Annual Session.

 

Pamela Ibeto (December 2017)

Pamela Ibeto ’19 is approaching her 4th year at Howard University School of Dentistry. After completing her GPR, she plans to open a private practice with her sister. In her interview, Pamela spoke about the importance of shadowing, maintaining good oral health, and her then-upcoming outreach trip to Nigeria. She also shares how she plans to improve the patient experience in a very interesting way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: oral health, dental education, dentistry, digital, philanthropy, continuing education, social media, networking

Dr. Gerald E. Davis II Discusses His Dentistry and Education Journey and His 10 Under 10 Award

Posted by THE NEXTDDS on Tue, Apr 10, 2018 @ 12:00 PM

Davis_220The American Dental Association announced the recipients of its inaugural 10 Under 10 Awards which recognizes 10 new dentists who graduated less than 10 years ago. The winners were chosen because they are making a difference in their work, science, research & education, philanthropy, leadership & advocacy, and inspiring others. One of the 2017 10 Under 10 awards recipients is Dr. Gerald E. Davis II. According to the American Dental Association (ADA), he has demonstrated dedication to dental education through his work as the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs and as an assistant professor at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee and as a member of the ADA Test Construction Committee. At Meharry, he worked with Microsoft to make the college a development site for innovative new dental student training technologies.

In this interview, Dr. Davis discusses his transition from student to professional, the importance of lifelong education, and offers good advice for this year’s graduating class.

THE NEXTDDS: What exactly led you down the dentistry route to begin with?

Dr. Davis: I stumbled into this field. When I was in the 8th grade, I attended programs at Baylor College of Dentistry, where we had the opportunity to conduct dental research. The research programs were meant for high school students, but they allowed me to participate. Being exposed to the field of dental research at that age gave me the initial spark. From there, I went on to other programs they had, such as the dental admission program, post baccalaureate programs, etc. At some point along the line, I applied to dental school at Meharry. When I was in college, dentistry became a full-fledged commitment.

THE NEXTDDS: Great! What did you learn in dental school that you’ve carried on through your professional career?

Dr. Davis: There were so many golden nuggets I would say. The main lesson I learned was the realization that I chose a field in which every day was a final exam, and each one of those exams were gatekeepers. There are many gatekeeper moments for the educational pathway. I remember thinking to myself, “If I don’t pass this course or exam, everything will be on the line.” You must acclimate yourself to this testing lifestyle. One thing occurred to me one day. I realized even after graduating from dental school and becoming a licensed dentist, when I see a patient on a given day, I can make a poor decision right then and there that results in the same outcome, whether it be a lawsuit or malpractice. You can still be back at square one. It’s the reality check of knowing that this is a perpetual way of life. Bottom line, you are always being tested to make sure you stay on your toes at all times.

THE NEXTDDS: Very important! The ADA states that the award recipients are “making a difference and inspiring their colleagues through their work.” Was the idea of “making a difference” a reason why you pursued this field initially? Discuss the importance of having an impact on the profession.

Dr. Davis: My passion is education. I’ve always been in love with knowledge and helping another person understand something. I’ve seen so many cases where I’ve been in classrooms with professors who would belittle students by saying, “You don’t get this.” Or “You should’ve learned this last year.”  One of the main areas of impact I wanted to have was the ability to relay information in such a fashion so that anyone who wants to pursue this field can do so successfully. That was really my desire. Getting into dental school or the field itself was hard and very selective. Only the people who knew someone in the field were guaranteed entry, so I wanted to find a way to extend this to anybody who isn’t connected. Basically, my passion is to help others become successful in this field. I want learning and teaching to be relayed in a fashion people can understand. I’ve been pursing that goal actively.

THE NEXTDDS: Fantastic! What steps did you take to prepare yourself for the transition from student to professional?

Dr. Davis: Whatever you want to be; I believe you already are. An oak tree is still an oak tree as a seed. All the elements for it to be an oak tree are housed in that seed. I’ve been preparing myself for this transition for years. In dental school, I carried myself a certain way. My peers would joke about me carrying a briefcase to school or in clinic when I was seeing patients, as well as humorous acts that showcased my professionalism. The point I’d like to drive home is this: If you are passionate about something, rather than abandon it and go in a completely different direction, find a way to marry what you are doing with the field that you’re pursuing. In my case, I was a biology major, but took all the prerequisite courses for education, so I tried to find a way to incorporate the dental and educational field in my profession. Some people see the way others do something and believe that’s the only way to do it, as opposed to realizing what they have is a uniqueness that will diversify the field and make an impact. If you want dentistry to propagate to the field that it can, you must diversify and bring in researchers, teachers, computer scientists, etc., not solely clinicians.

THE NEXTDDS: Wonderful insight! Are there a few things you know now as an established dental professional that you wish you learned as a D1 student?

Dr. Davis: I was doing better than I thought I was. There were times where I would think the world is coming to an end if I failed an exam. I used to be very hard on myself. I later realized that I was progressing just fine. As an academic dean, I have access to my own dental records and I saw my class rank and realized that I was not doing as bad as I thought I was. I was too critical on myself. A part of me is glad that I had that mind state because it pushed me to go forward. However, I do think to myself, “If I had known this, where would I be today?”

THE NEXTDDS: Discuss the importance of continuing education. How do you continue learning?

Dr. Davis: For me, it’s not good enough to have…for lack of a better term, if you have a gun, but no bullets, it doesn’t serve a purpose. I’d like to think that having the ability to teach and articulate information in a way others can understand is beautiful. However, if you don’t have any information to articulate then you don’t have anything to say. By default, I need to have enough information that’s worth relaying and a need to address. I focus on these 3 areas: lifelong testing, lifelong service, and lifelong learning. I’ve been involved with organized dentistry with the American Dental Association. I’ve attended programs such as UC San Diego’s Faculty Development for the Underserved, as well as free clinics for dental services. I also obtained my master’s degree in dental education at University of the Pacific. Now I’m enrolled in USC’s Oral Facial Pain and Oral Medicine program. Clearly, I’m not a stranger to continuing education, and I would encourage everyone to try to learn and to gain more information, so they can be better clinicians and simply be better the field.

 THE NEXTDDS: Very motivating! What is your best recommendation for a student who is beginning this transition?

Dr. Davis: My best recommendation would be to marry your passion with the field. If you were originally an engineer or whatever your previous background was before dentistry, understand that that makes you an expert in that regard, and unique in this field. My mother used to tell me, “If you want to make an impact, you must find a need to fill it.” As a recent graduate, take the time to find a need and figure out how you can be a solution to that need. It will be hard because we all have mountains of student loans to pay back, but I believe that if God provides you a vision, He will also provide the provision. If you have the vision to follow a path, the provision to do so will come. I am a living witness of that story and belief. I would encourage any dental school graduate to try to do that same pursuit.

THE NEXTDDS: What a great message for this year’s graduating class! Dr. Davis, thank you for taking the time to share your dentistry journey with us! Congratulations on making the ADA’s 10 Under 10 List!

 

Tags: new dentists, networking after dental school, dental education, continuing education

Importance of Lifelong Education

Posted by THE NEXTDDS on Fri, May 19, 2017 @ 10:15 AM

AD_CE.pngYou are the best and brightest dentist in your town, with freshly minted skills and knowledge. How will you maintain that edge and continue to be the best provider that you can be? Through continuing education (CE). Continuing Education is extremely important to keep dentists of all levels on top of their games, since the field is evolving rapidly with new technologies and digital solutions that improve practice efficiency and patient care. Journals are an important resource, but without a well-developed plan including hands-on courses, classes, and lectures, you may lose that edge.

It is widely held that the body of scientific knowledge in healthcare doubles every six months. The one article that may fundamentally change the way you practice and impact the standard of care may be published the day after you graduate from dental school. You need a well thought out plan that will keep you abreast of changes that occur in the profession. You can quickly learn about new approaches that provide better outcomes, happier patients, and a more efficient workflow for you and your staff. Some products or techniques that you currently rely upon may be found to have significant adverse effects, or a newer generation of those products may be described that can make what you learned from your mentors obsolete. You, your patients, and your staff deserve the latest scientific knowledge available.

The Importance of Compliance

Dentists in all 50 states must acquire and maintain a license to practice. The vast majority of states require license renewal every one to three years, and most of those renewals require a prescribed number of CE hours and credits. Many states have specific guidelines on what types of CE they will or will not accept, such as home study versus group education formats, classes on ethics, courses on domestic violence and child abuse recognition, prescribing, and care of the underserved. If you want to continue practicing, you will have to comply with the rules of licensure in your state. State-by-state regulations vary, and links to information on these regulations can be found here.

But CE is not simply designed to keep you out of trouble. Through CE courses, you have the opportunity to improve your skills and learn the latest clinical techniques from qualified, knowledgeable instructors. Thus, your patients can be offered the latest diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic methods in the industry. Letting your patients know that you are the first dentist in the area to offer this new approach will help with practice marketing as well, since word of mouth from satisfied patients is a powerful tool. Your reputation in the community will improve as a direct result of your cutting-edge approach to dental care.

Opportunities for Professional Development

Continuing education courses are often designed for the dentist to have fun while learning. Some live courses are offered in vacation destinations, and industry conventions such as the ADA Annual Session, Chicago Dental Society’s Midwinter Meeting, and the Greater New York Dental Meeting now feature live patient demonstrations and exhibitions with vendors with whom dentists can interact. Manufacturers will demonstrate new technologies available to improve the efficiency and results achievable in your practice. Many dentists travel to these conferences with their families, combining education with entertainment. You can also meet and network with other dental professionals, opening new career pathways for you as you begin your new position in the dental industry. In almost all cases, traveling to and attending CE courses is a tax deductible expense for you and your practice. Once you return to work that next Monday morning, you can begin to share your new knowledge and clinical “pearls” with other dentists in your practice, your support staff, and your patients.

Self-Directed Education

The Internet has fundamentally changed the way we gain information—and consume CE. Interactive CE courses abound, many more engaging than a printed journal. Interactive education through online webinars (live or archived), instructional videos, and the like allow you and your professional peers to consume CE at your own pace and convenience. Finding high-quality CE courses that fit your needs, schedule, and finances is easy. The American Dental Association and the American Dental Education Association provide numerous self-study programs that are certified for CE credits, and also list links to live CE courses and CE providers. THE NEXTDDS is a leading provider of educational articles, videos, and
webinars, with multimedia courses available free to dental professionals. Your state’s dental licensing board is also a reliable resource for local and national courses for dentists.

Conclusion

Continuing education is a critical component to your ongoing success in practice. While it is true that it is a requirement for licensure, the reasons to actively plan for and seek CE go far beyond that. CE courses keep you sharp, educated, attractive to patients, and marketable for your next career move. Aspen Dental Management Inc., is a great resource for high-quality education for you in your successful career as a dentist and available to support you throughout the journey. Ask us today how we can help!

 

Are you a recently graduated D4 student? Check out these related articles:

Dental Practice Insurance that Pays for Itself
Ten Tips for Running a Successful Practice
Partnering for Success

Tags: continuing education, education

The "New Dentist Track" at the CDS Midwinter Meeting

Posted by John Papa on Mon, Mar 02, 2015 @ 09:39 AM

This year, the Chicago Dental Society offered a track of four courses specifically written and designed for new dentists. These courses were intended to give new dentists insight and tips in certain areas that might be overlooked or not covered in-depth in traditional dental school curricula. The four courses that were included in the “New Dentist Track” were:
  • Leadership in Social Media for New Dentists: Presented by Ms. Rita Zamora
  • Risky Business: What are the Dangers and How to Prepare: Presented by Dr. Roy Shelburne
  • Career Paths in the Private Practice of Dentistry: Presented by Mr. Peter Ackerman, and
  • Sales free Selling: The Death of Sales and the Rise of New Methodology: Presented by Dr. Steve Fretzin

In her social media course, Ms. Rita Zamora began by establishing the idea of creating and maintaining your online brand/identity. Her words of advice to the would-be social media savvy dentist were: know yourself, know your brand, live your brand, be visible, and lead by example. She went on to discuss social media marketing through Facebook ads or Google ad words, and suggested using small incentives to get patients to “Check-in”, “Like”, or “Follow” your social media outlets; such as giving out whitening strips (or some other one-time-use item) for check-ins before appointments. As for negative patient reviews on social media, her advice was to either ignore them or to reach out to the complaining patient personally via email or phone, talk to them, and see if they will take the review down afterwards. You can read more about Social Media Marketing and Integrating Social Media in your Future Practice on THE NEXTDDS.

Dr. Roy Shelburne’s presentation on risk management was focused on pointing out the small things that sometimes get overlooked by new dentists which could result in a visit from the IRS. He began his presentation by saying that every new dentist should know the legal definition of intent. He then went on to describe what, in his eyes, constitute the five biggest legal threats to your practice: failure to comply with HIPPA, OSHA, tax laws, the dental practice acts of your state, and other contractual obligations. He touched briefly on informed consent, malpractice claims, and record keeping; stating that keeping air-tight records of every procedure, why it was done, and how it was done is a good way to insulate yourself from malpractice suits, but that the biggest protection from malpractice suits is to have a good relationship with your patients.

Mr. Ackerman led off his “Career Paths” course by explaining his outlook about the future of the dental profession. Due to a number of factors including increased competitiveness in the field, growing student debt, distribution of new dental offices, changes in patient values, and older dentists being forced to work longer, the allure of “corporate dentistry” appears to be growing for new graduates. He does, however, still believe there are viable paths to private practice ownership for young dentists. He went on to discuss associateships at length, including why they sometimes fail, how to best insulate yourself from liability and failure, many legal issues that arise through associateships including contractual obligations, terms of agreement, compensation, "due diligence" research, and types of practice sales (retirement [full]) sales, delayed full sales, extended sales, and partial sales). Read more about making the transition from Student to Professional in THE NEXTDDS Magazine

Steve Fretzin ispecializes in coaching business owners on the finer points of sales and investment. In his presentation, Mr. Fretzin explained his new methodology of sales, which favors a much more consultative and relationship-oriented approach over the traditional sales model. He then explained how his sales model is specifically applicable in the dental/medical fields, especially during patient consultation and in attempting to garner interest and consent for treatment plans.

The New Dentist track at the CDS Midwinter meeting is a way for young dentists and current dental students alike to learn some of the finer points of business management, legal matters, and marketing that may not have been covered in depth during dental school. Each of the speakers were passionate their subjects, and gave easily applicable tips that could improve business, exposure, and revenue while reducing risk and liability for a new practice owner. As dental students attending the CDS Midwinter, the New Dentist track is one way to get a jump on one’s professional career, and to start thinking about the real-world business of dentistry in a new and exciting way.

Tags: midwinter, CDS, CE, continuing education, marketing, liability, sales, New Dentist Track, social media, legal, associateship

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